From SPRING HOME Magazine: Major Makeover Gives Paul Lake Rambler a Whole New Look

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Mary Kay Hammans had no look or style in mind when she and her husband, Craig, decided it was time to renovate their home on Lake Paul, west of Perham.

She just knew how she wanted it Feel.

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The house was going to get bigger with the remodel, she knew that, but she wanted her to maintain the privacy of the smallest home they had come to know and love over the years.


A new Great Room on the <a class=ground floor of the Hammans House features vaulted ceilings and large windows offering views of Lake Paul. Bricks from the old Mary Kay High School in Milwaukee, Wisc. Are incorporated into the fireplace. (Photo submitted)” width=”1140″ height=”-1″/>

A new Great Room on the ground floor of the Hammans House features vaulted ceilings and large windows offering views of Lake Paul. Bricks from the old Mary Kay High School in Milwaukee, Wisc. Are incorporated into the fireplace. (Photo submitted)

She wanted her to be warm and open; a place that brings friends and family together and encourages interaction. A house with unique and personal touches, like reused fireplace bricks from her old high school, and a large dining table that belonged to her mother – a table that has seen many family game nights over the years , and will continue to see a lot more.

“We wanted to create a welcoming place where everyone feels welcome,” explains Mary Kay. “A place where the focus is on the hearts and souls of all who enter and on the community we have with one another.”

The Hammans family has a nearly 20 year history with the house. They bought the modest brown hiker in 2002, when their two boys were still quite young, and spent their occasional summers, vacations and weekends there. The boys often brought their friends from the Perham summer baseball program to swim and play games.

“It was the kind of place where everyone came to relax and unwind,” says Mary Kay. “This was not the manor by the lake where you had to take off your shoes and be careful. These boys were hanging out here like they were in their own living room.

Mary Kay and Craig didn’t want that element of comfort to go away with the makeover, but as the boys have all grown up now, she says they were ready to make changes and additions to meet their needs and preferences today. ‘hui.


The lake side of the house, BEFORE the renovation.  (Photo submitted)

The lake side of the house, BEFORE the renovation. (Photo submitted)


A view of the lake from the house last winter, AFTER most exterior renovations have been completed.  (Photo submitted)

A view of the lake from the house last winter, AFTER most exterior renovations have been completed. (Photo submitted)

The kitchen, for example, was ready for an overhaul. Mary Kay is a dietetic graduate and loves to cook for large groups; she always wanted her “dream kitchen,” she says, and with this remodel, “I finally got it.”

The new kitchen features spacious white and ecru cabinetry, a large kitchen island, a 48-inch 6-burner range that is “better for managing pans when cooking for a crowd” and plenty of counter space for the kitchen. food preparation, Mary Kay describes. And since she and the rest of the family are on the large side, everything in the kitchen is set up 2 inches higher than in a standard kitchen, ergonomically designed just for them.

Other features they worked on in the remodel include a large room that overlooks the lake, a “wine cellar” for Mary Kay’s wine hobby (Craig also has a large “man cave” for tinkering) , a wet bar, a master suite, a formal entrance and more.

Kelli Wegscheid, of Harmonious Architecture in Perham, helped them through the design and construction process. The construction schedule has been longer than expected due to pandemic shipping delays and supply chain issues, but May Kay says she and Craig plan to move into their newly renovated home in May. and they are delighted.

“It really turned out to be phenomenal,” she says. “We are really happy.”


A FRONT photo of the Hamann's house, seen from the side of the road.  (Photo submitted)

A FRONT photo of the Hamann’s house, seen from the side of the road. (Photo submitted)


A AFTER shot of the main entrance, visible from the side of the road.  (Photo submitted)

A AFTER shot of the main entrance, visible from the side of the road. (Photo submitted)

While many old bones from the houses remain intact, part of the layout was reworked as part of the renovation, and 1,100 square feet were added to the original building. The house still has four bedrooms, as before, but one of them is now a master bedroom. An addition built towards the lake features vaulted ceilings and large windows offering great views, while a new TV room sits on the lower level just below. A new garage has been built and a powder room and a bathroom have been added at the entrance to the garage.

“The rest of the house has been remodeled with new light fixtures, plumbing, paint, moldings, doors, etc.,” says Wegscheid. “The old family room has been transformed into a master bedroom, with a view of the lake.”

Wegscheid says the Hammans Project is one of many renovation projects she has seen and worked on in the Lake District over the past year. Low interest rates and lack of inventory in the housing market have led to an increase in renovations in recent months, as has the COVID-19 pandemic: “People are using money previously set aside for travel on house projects, ”she says.

Emotional connections are also a major factor in renovations. Many homeowners become fond of their neighbors and their neighborhood over the years and don’t like the idea of ​​moving, even when their home no longer meets their needs. Others grew up spending their summers in the family cabin and want to keep it in the family for the next generation. In both cases, the remodeling becomes inevitable.

While whole-home remodeling projects like those of the Hammans family are not uncommon, Wegscheid says the majority of renovations focus on a room or part of a house, kitchens, bathrooms and bathrooms. main suites being the most popular renovation requests.


The Hammans kitchen BEFORE the renovation.  (Photo submitted)

The Hammans kitchen BEFORE the renovation. (Photo submitted)


The Hammans Kitchen AFTER the remodel is larger, brighter and better suited to Mary Kay "volume cooking" needs, she said.  (Photo submitted)

The Hammans kitchen AFTER the remodel is larger, brighter, and better suited to Mary Kay’s “volume cooking” needs, she says. (Photo submitted)

  1. Confirm the state of your foundation. Older homes, especially lake houses and cottages from the 1940s and 1950s, often have unsuitable foundations or have no foundation at all. “Don’t spend money on a renovation if the house doesn’t stand up,” advises Kelli Wegscheid of Harmonious Architecture in Perham. “Houses that were meant to be just summer cottages are really hard to renovate… At this point a lot of people decide to just tear them down and build new ones.” Homes built later, from around the 1970s, are more likely to have a solid base and frame, but may still require expensive energy upgrades such as new windows, doors, garage doors, heating and air conditioning and a new roof.

  2. Know the difference between a “redo” and a “refresh”. Take the example of kitchens. Kitchens are the number one design feature in homes today, and Wegscheid says renovating them can be “a really expensive project; the most expensive room in the house. A complete overhaul involves changing the layout or footprint of the room, which requires demolition, plumbing changes, and possible electrical upgrades. At this point, says Wegscheid, most people also decide to remove all drywall and replace insulation, windows, soffits, and the ceiling, to avoid a noticeable contrast between the old and the new. It can be difficult to know where to stop with redesigns, she says, “to be considered” before embarking on this type of project. A less extensive – and less expensive – option is to keep the existing kitchen layout and simply install new cabinets, counters, sinks, and light fixtures where the old ones were. The difference in cost is significant, Wegscheid says, with a simple discount ranging from $ 10,000 to $ 15,000, on average, compared to a potential cost of around $ 50,000 for a complete overhaul – or more, if expensive new devices are part of it. from the whole.

  3. Consider cosmetic changes. If you’re on a budget or just want to refresh the look of your home, Wegscheid says some relatively inexpensive and easy-to-consider solutions include: new light fixtures, new door hardware, a new front door, or garage, updated paint. , and new flooring.

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